Cavoodles

We absolutely love all the oodle type of dogs.   We have a special place for the Cavoodle as we have one ourselves (his name is Teddy).  On this page we will go through the characteristics of the Cavoodle.  Oodles Inn specialises in Cavoodle Dog Boarding.

Cavoodle Dog Boarding
BOOKING REQUEST

OTHER NAME: Cavapoo
COUNTRY OF ORIGIN: N/A

ORIGIN

The cavoodle is a hybrid of a cavalier king charles spaniel and a poodle (toy or miniature). They have become increasingly popular over the last 10 years. The aim of crossbreeding is to minimise the genetic diseases that can be present in purebred dogs. First-cross cavoodles will have the maximum genetic benefits associated with a hybrid dog – in other words, a cavoodle with one parent purebred cavalier king charles spaniel and one parent purebred poodle will have less genetic diseases than second or third cross cavoodles.

DESCRIPTION

The cavoodle is a small dog with that usually has a thick soft coat that can be wavy or straight. The muzzle is usually medium length and the eyes are large and brown. Being a crossbreed, their appearance can vary significantly from dog to dog.

Size Small
Colour Gold, tan, cream, black, brown - with or without markings in these colours.
Coat Length Long
Weight/Height Range 5-12kg and 25- 38cm depending on the breed of the parents.
Ailments Luxating patellas (dislocating knee caps), allergic skin disease, cataracts, epilepsy.
Breed Classification Known as a group of crossbred dogs called ‘oodles’ or poodle-crosses.

FEEDING & OWNERSHIP

It is best to feed the cavoodle dry food as this breed is prone to tartar build up on their teeth.

Food Cost $5 to $10
Other Expenses After the initial purchase price of a puppy, it must be remembered that there will be regular grooming expenditure every 6 weeks.

PERSONALITY

The cavoodle is a lively and very affectionate companion. They enjoy being part of the family unit and love to participate in the activities of the day. Cavoodles have a very gentle nature and can make wonderful companions for children. They can adapt to living in a small home or apartment as long as they receive adequate daily exercise. Cavoodles can be good guard dogs as they may bark when visitors arrive, however are not aggressive. They can be quite vocal and prone to separation anxiety was early socialisation and training is a must

Intelligence The cavoodle is an intelligent dog that thrives with regular training and human interaction.
Energy High
Suitability for Children High
Tendency to Bark High
Overall Exercise Requirement Daily walks and regular trips to the dog park will keep help keep a cavoodle’s energy levels under control. They often enjoy socialising with other dogs and can be trained to retrieve a ball.
Suitability as a Guard Dog Medium
Ease of Transportation High
Level of Aggression Low
Other Animal Compatibility High

GROOMING

Cavoodles usually do not shed and are often tolerated by allergic people. Their coats do take a great deal of care though, generally requiring professional grooming, as well as regular combing and brushing at home. The cavoodle should be taken to a groomer about every six weeks for a clip of your choice. The cavoodle’s ears need frequent cleaning or they may become infected and, daily teeth brushing is recommended or tartar will build up rapidly and lead to gingivitis. The eyes should be cleaned daily to prevent a build-up eye discharge and tear staining.

Grooming Requirements Once a week
Amount of hair shed None

Meet our other Oodles

Cavoodle Dog Boarding
Cavoodle Dog Boarding
Moodle Dog Boarding
Moodle Dog Boarding
Labradoodle Dog Boarding
Labradoodle Dog Boarding
Schnoodle Dog Boarding
Schnoodle Dog Boarding
Groodle Dog Boarding
Groodle Dog Boarding
Spoodle Dog Boarding
Spoodle Dog Boarding

Show your support

RSPCA

Certainly, For all creatures great and small. Support the RSPCA. Most noteworthy, the RSPCA’s policies are underpinned by the science of animal welfare.

Australian Animal Protection Society

If you have found an animal and it semms like they may be stray or lost, please contact AAPS on 9798 8415 for advice. Certainly, the animal has the best chance of returning home if it remains in the area that it was found.

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